Minorities in Public Policy Studies (MiPPS) is a registered student organization at the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy.

MiPPS serves as an academic, social, and cultural resource for policy students in the Harris School.

Harris MIPPS welcomes Mr. Adolfo Hernandez, Director of City of Chicago Office of New Americans to our first 2013-14 Lunch and Learn series on Thursday, November 7, 2013 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm.  The event will be held at Harris School of Public Policy, 1150 E 60th Street, Rm 140C.  Lunch will be provided.  Please come join us!

Harris MIPPS welcomes Mr. Adolfo Hernandez, Director of City of Chicago Office of New Americans to our first 2013-14 Lunch and Learn series on Thursday, November 7, 2013 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm.  The event will be held at Harris School of Public Policy, 1150 E 60th Street, Rm 140C.  Lunch will be provided.  Please come join us!

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In celebration of Memorial Day and Asian American Pacific Islander month, today’s POC in policy is Daniel Inouye, Hawaii’s nine-term senator.

Senator Inouye served as a medical volunteer during the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941. When the US Army ended its ban on the enlistment of Japanese Americans in 1943, Senator Inouye cut his medical studies short to enlist in the US Army, joining the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team. He went on to become a decorated war hero, losing his right arm on the battlefield. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal and a Purple Heart for his valor. In 2000, President Clinton awarded him the Medal of Honor for his World War II service.

A second-generation Nisei, Senator Inouye was the first Japanese American elected to both the House of Representatives and the Senate, and represented his home state of Hawaii in Congress since it attained statehood in 1959. At the time of his death in December of 2012, he was the highest-ranking Asian American politician in America, President pro tempore of the Senate, and the second longest serving senator in US history.

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"I bring quadruple diversity to the Senate: I’m a woman; I’ll be the first Asian woman ever to be elected to the U.S. Senate; I am an immigrant; I am a Buddhist. When I said this at one of my gatherings, they said, ‘Yes, but are you gay?’ and I said, ‘Nobody’s perfect.’"

As part of our continued celebration of Asian American Pacific Islander Month, today’s POC in policy is Senator Mazie Hirono. Senator Hirono is the first Asian American woman elected to the Senate, the first female senator elected from Hawaii, the nation’s first Buddhist senator, and the first Asian-born senator.

In the Senate, Senator Hirono serves on the Judiciary Committee, where she has been active in advancing women’s rights in the immigration debate. In March 2013, she made history by convening the first Senate Judiciary hearing on immigrant women.

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Lawrence Benito is the CEO of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR), a leading organization working with the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM) to fight for just and humane immigration policies. 

Mr. Benito was honored by the White House as a Cesar Chávez Champion of Change earlier this year for his work fighting for justice for immigrants and other disenfranchised groups. The son of immigrants from the Philippines, Mr. Benito has dedicated the past 20 years to this work. He also serves on the board of directors for Chicago Public Media and is the immediate past president of the Asian American Action Fund of Chicago.

MiPPS will host Mr. Benito as part of our Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month celebration on Tuesday, May 21st, at the Harris School of Public Policy. The event is noon to 1:00 pmClick here for more information and to RSVP!

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Alderman Ameya Pawar was elected in 2011, making him the first Indian American and Asian American to join the Chicago City Council. While running for office, Alderman Pawar created an app, Chicago Works, making it possible for Chicago residents to make service requests from their iPhones. 

Alderman Pawar was named to Crain’s 40 Under 40 list in 2011 and as an Edgar Fellow by the University of Illinois in 2012. He represents Chicago’s 47th ward.

MiPPS will host Alderman Pawar as part of our Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month celebration on Wednesday, May 15th, at the Harris School of Public Policy. The event is noon to 1:00 pm. Click here for more information and to RSVP!

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Walk the street with us into history. Get off the sidewalk.

Dolores Huerta, a labor and civil rights leader, co-founded the National Farmworkers Association (now known as the United Farm Workers) with César Chávez. Over a career spanning more than 50 years, Ms. Huerta led national efforts to end the exploitation of farm workers and extend governmental protections.

Ms. Huerta took time off from her union work to work with the Feminist Majority’s campaign, Feminization of Power: 50/50 by the year 2000, to encourage Latina candidates to run for office. The campaign resulted in a significant increase in the number of women holding local, state, and federal office.

Ms. Huerta has received numerous awards for her civil, human, and immigrant rights work, including the Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Human Rights and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Eric Holder

uchicagopolitics:

From U.S. News & World Report in 2008, when Holder was being vetted to be President Obama’s attorney general. Woah: #8.

Come see him live on Tuesday, April 30, when he joins our event, “Restoring Justice: The Legacy of Edward Levi,” at 6 p.m. at Logan Arts Center. Free & open to the public; get your tickets here: http://bit.ly/11reC9l

Source: uchicagopolitics

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Next Thursday, MiPPS will honor Kim Hunt, Executive Director of Affinity Community Services, at its 11th Annual Alumni Dinner.

Affinity Community Services is a social justice organization focusing on health and wellness, leadership development, and community building. Its core constituency consists of Chicago’s LGBTQ community; however, the organization’s work addresses the needs of the city’s LGBTQ and Black communities.

A 2004 alumna of the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy, Ms. Hunt is co-founder and managing partner of O-H Community Partners, Ltd, a management consulting firm that provides capacity building and technical assistance services to non-profits, foundations, and government agencies.  She has over 20 years experience in public policy and urban planning, with a focus on transportation issues.

We hope you’ll be able to join us in honoring Ms. Hunt. RSVP today!

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Give light and people will find the way

Ella Baker was a civil and human rights activist. In 1943, she became the highest ranking woman in the NAACP when she was named the Director of Branches. Ms. Baker’s philosophy of encouraging average folks to take on leadership roles in their communities is reflected in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organization she helped establish.

Ms. Baker also served as a mentor to leaders like Rosa Parks and Stokely Carmichael, and worked with Dr. King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Southern Conference Education Fund. 

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The environmental movement has to start looking out for the health and well-being of all communities, regardless of race or immigration status

Sudha Nandagopal has a long history as an outspoken proponent and educator on environment and social justice issues. During her fellowship year with Green Corps, a highly competitive environmental organizing training program, Ms. Nandagopal worked on issues ranging from cruise ship pollution of oceans to mercury pollution in water.

She currently serves as the Communications Director for SEIU Local 925, where she is able to connect the issues of environment, public health, and social justice on a regular basis.